Frans Krans - Moby Cock - Stereo Stickman

Frans Krans Moby Cock

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Frans Krans keep high energy punk rock alive and well with this memorably titled album Moby Cock. In line with the comedic implications of the project name, most of the songs follow a similarly free approach, though quite surprisingly this doesn’t come through as the main trait of their music. On the contrary, you get a classic anthem feel from many of the tracks – as well as a lot that is fairly incomparable right now.

Amstercum as an opener is the perfect example. Cascading guitars and high octane drums accompany a chorus of voices and a structurally varied melody that lets the experience rain down in the way that vintage indie rock once did. And with all of this comes a sense of authenticity – as if this is what the band have to do, this is what they’ll be doing whether you’re listening or not. It’s a great sound, raw and real, with some refreshingly entertaining songwriting.

Elsewhere on the project, the sound quickly settles into its own, though there are numerous moods and sentiments outlined throughout. Manly Machine feels more intense, distorted and heavy yet with a gentle verse melody and shorter, expressive lines. The personal touch intrigues and this song in particular makes you really want to listen in full. You can lose yourself in the fullness of the sound – think back to the mosh-pits of the nineties and earlier, if you can; or just revel in the originality as it stands today.

Keeping things consistently eclectic ticks another crucial box for this project. Call Me Ishmael sees a simple, memorable riff drive – followed by a poetic, fascinating story-line and another huge chorus. A personal highlight for the height of that hook melody and the vocal togetherness it utilizes. Cock Of Love follows and lightens the tone, conceptually. Musically that heaviness continues, as does the fast pace. The band are likely to put on a fairly unmissable live show. The back and forth between vocals here adds a welcomed touch of theatre to the collection.

Ass Surfing is a musical highlight, perhaps for its warm sound and the somewhat widely accessible nature of the melody and the instrumentation. Lyrics aside, this feels somewhat more U2-like than anything Green Day or Queens Of The Stone Age. With the lyrics though, it becomes its own thing entirely. You’d possibly miss the true nature of the story-line if you were to purely let the music envelop you – the sound is awesome, easy to get swept away by; particularly if there’s a dance floor nearby. The truth is the band write however the hell they want to, and for this it’s easy to appreciate their style even more so.

Postman picks up the pace intensely towards the end of the album, immense drum work and a relentless melody-line to match. The lyrics again are quickly anthemic, the sort that would lure even the most distant audience members over for a quick jump around and a tribal chant of that central line. The Journey afterwards feels like a rightfully epic song with a thoughtful concept at its core. There’s an energizing nature to the performance, and to much of this album in full actually. A grand choice for any day of the week – whenever you need a little lift, or the noise of the world gets a little too unbearable.

A Paintball Story brings the album to a creatively striking finish. A brilliant set-up, incredible instrumental performances and a final vocal delivery that offers up one of the most complex melodies yet – though alongside of this is a quickly enjoyable story-line and a song that turns out to be a genuinely unique addition to the collection, and a great way to end it. Frans Krans are highly likely to win you over, whichever song you choose – though the album in full is where the real fun lies.

Find & follow Frans Krans on Facebook & Instagram.

Rebecca Cullen

Founder & Editor

Musician & writer with an MA in Songwriting.

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